Tate Modern’s new Switch House

The new Switch House at Tate Modern in London designed by Swiss architectural firm Herzog & de Meuron.
The new Switch House at Tate Modern in London designed by Swiss architectural firm Herzog & de Meuron. View from the West side of the building with the river Thames on the left side (to the North) of the museum. Please note the reflections of the sun from the neighboring glass clad buildings.

In June 2016 Tate Modern opened the new Switch House building to the public. The new building houses exhibition spaces, a 360 degree public viewing deck on the tenth floor, a new restaurant on the ninth floor and a new members room on the eight floor. The architects that designed the new building were the same ones that redesigned the Bankside power station that opened in 2000, Herzog & de Meuron. Tate modern has many different well put together exhibits throughout the year. The permanent collection is also very interesting and it is free for everyone. If you plan on going more than a few times during your visit to London you may want to consider becoming a member, it is not too expensive and it gives you free access to all exhibitions. In addition you can visit the member rooms and it also includes Tate Britain across the Thames.

A panoramic view over the Tames from the viewing deck.
A panoramic view over the Tames from the viewing deck on the 10:th floor of the Switch House. Click image to see larger version in a new tab.
Tate Modern seen from the Milennium bridge with the new Switch House in the background.
Tate Modern seen from the Millennium bridge with the new Switch House in the background.
The Switch House from the other side.
The Switch House in the sun.
Tate Switch House
Tate Switch House
Looking up at the Switch House.
Looking up at the Switch House.
Staircase in the Switch House
Staircase in the Switch House.

I like this structure, from the top viewing deck to the bottom Tank spaces made from the old oil tanks that were used to store the fuel for the power plant when that was the purpose of  the building. It wouldn’t be wrong to say that the building has gone from producing power for the homes and offices in London to producing fuel for the human sole instead. The sweeping lines o the concrete contrasted with the black handrails and the light wood floors – beautiful in itself and then add all the fabulous art and it becomes just so super good! As far as newer buildings in London, I think this is really the cream of the crop – go explore!

Switch House interior.
Switch House interior.
Second floor of the Switch House.
Second floor of the Switch House.
Interior view of a corner of the Switch House.
Interior view of a corner of the Switch House.
The nice sweeping lines of the staircase in contrast to the angular elements in the structure. Also note the contrast between the harsher concrete and the warm wood flooring.
The nice sweeping lines of the staircase in contrast to the angular elements in the structure. Also note the contrast between the harsher concrete and the warm wood flooring.
View from inside the brick "laced" Switch House.
View from inside the brick “laced” Switch House.
Down in the basement between the new Switch House and the old Boiler House is the Tanks.
Down in the basement between the new Switch House and the old Boiler House is the Tanks.
The Tanks spaces at Tate modern.
The Tanks spaces at Tate modern.
The Tanks.
The Tanks, former oil storage tanks for the power plant.
xDominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Séance de Shadow II (bleu) 1998, in the Tanks allows the visitor to take part in making the art.
Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Séance de Shadow II (bleu) 1998. This exhibit in the Tanks allow the visitor to take part in making the art.
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